Connect with us

Middle East

Daesh fighters depart Syria, Iraq

Published

on

As Daesh (IS) territory in both Syria and Iraqi is pushed ever smaller, monitoring group Soufan Centre says that some 5,6000 who joined the militant organization have returned to their homes. 

A report from the organization says those that return will continue to present a security challenge, especially for many western countries often targeted by the militant group.

However, it also cites a United States official saying that fewer so-called Islamic State fighters have returned then anticipated as Daesh suffers losses to the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, Iraqi military and other anti-militant factions.

The report says that those who stay now will likely stay until the end of the militant group, whether that come soon or down the road.

The US-based Soufan Centre points out that foreigners joining the fight from abroad had slowed drastically in 2015, after countries nearby such as Turkey became more efficient at stopping militant hopefuls from reaching Daesh territory. It was also attributed to militant losses that year.

According to the monitoring group, some 180 Canadians have joined the fight, with 60 since returned and 90 remaining.

Daesh once held swathes of territory in northern Iraq and Syria that it gained during its “lightening strike” in 2014. Since October 2016, massive US-backed offensives have taken Mosul, Raqqa and hundreds of villages.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces claimed victory over the de facto capital of Daesh last week.

An estimated 40,000 fighters from 110 countries have joined IS since 2014.

According to the LA Times, Interpol has placed 19,000 names on an international watch list used at airports and borders, data gleaned from captured Daesh administrative hubs such as Raqqa.


More details to follow. Image 1 of Daesh (IS) flag from Wikimedia Commons. 

 

 

  ■

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Middle East

Israeli settlements in West Bank no longer illegal, says U.S.

The shift created backlash.

Published

on

The United States on Monday shifted its longtime policy stance and stated that they no longer view Israeli settlements in the West Bank as inconsistent with international law, a move welcomed by the Israeli government but condemned by Palestinian leaders.

Settlements are communities established by Israel on land occupied during a war in 1967 over the Middle East and have for many years been part of the dispute between Israel and the Palestinians.

“After carefully studying all sides of the legal debate … the United States has concluded that the establishment of Israeli civilian settlements in the West Bank is not, per se, inconsistent with international law,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters.

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat called the U.S. decision was a risk to “global stability, security, and peace” and said it threatened to replace international law with “the law of the jungle”, according to the BBC.

U.S. President Donald Trump recognized the whole city of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel in December 2017 and moved the United States Embassy to the city later on.

Jerusalem’s many holy sites are significant to the major religions of Judaism, Islam and Christianity with the city being claimed by both the Jew-majority Israel and the Islam-majority Palestinian territories.  ■

Continue Reading

Middle East

Several dead in Afghan mosque bombing

Blast kills Afghan National Army soldiers.

Published

on

Eli Ridder | Report

Varying reports say between 10 and 25 people have been killed and several more injured after a blast struck inside a mosque on Friday in Afghanistan’s eastern Khost province.

The explosion appeared to target soldiers belonging to the 2nd regiment of the Afghan National Army as they held afternoon prayers inside a military base.

The blast happened around 1:30 p.m. local time, Captain Abdullah, a spokesman for the 2nd Regiment of Army in Mandozai district in Khost, told Tolo News.

More details to follow. Image of Afghan National Army from Wikimedia. ■

Continue Reading

Middle East

Diplomatic, trade tensions flare between Canada, Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia reacted to a statement by Canada on human rights issues.

Published

on

Eli Ridder | Report

The Canadian envoy to Saudi Arabia has been given 24 hours to leave the country, and the Saudi ambassador has been recalled, according to a Sunday report by the Saudi Press Agency, and froze all new trade and investment deals with Canada.

It comes after Canada’s foreign minister Chrystia Freeland tweeted her support for the sister of a jailed blogger who was arrested by Saudi authorities last week.

In a statement issued by the Saudi Arabian Foreign Ministry, Riyadh slams as “totally false” allegations by the Canadian authorities that recent arrests of several activists were unwarranted.

It says the arrests were made by “the competent authorities” and the detainees were provided with all the rights guaranteed during investigative and trail stages.

The ministry denounces Canada’s stance as “explicit interference in the internal affairs” of the kingdom that runs “contrary to the most basic international norms and charters that govern relations between countries, as well as “negative and surprising.”

Besides putting on hold “all new trade and investment transactions with Canada,” the ministry said that the ultra-conservative kingdom, that has drawn stark criticism from human righst group for its crackdown on dissent, “retains the right to take further action.”


 

  ■

Continue Reading

Trending

© The Avro Post 2017-2019