The Weather Networks’ Chief Meteorologist Chris Scott warns Canadians for a “stormy winter” this season.

Although climate change continues to alter our average weather patterns, this season is expected to be a classic, Canadian winter.

According to The Weather Network the reason behind this is because of La Niña climate patterns. La Niña is the decrease of water surface temperatures that in turns effects the weather to become cooler. “No two La Niña events are exactly alike, …” says sources at The Weather Network. “…but La Niña has a reputation for focusing the coldest and most active winter weather across Western Canada.”

In order to understand what Canadians can expect this winter, the Weather Network claims that the weather patterns are similar to the winter of 2007-2008. Just to refresh your memory, Canadians faced up to 194 centimeters of snow that winter; becoming the third-snowiest record in the city.

Although the majority of Canada is preparing for a heavy winter, our Northern neighbours should expect either normal or below normal temperatures. “Milder than normal temperatures are expected for most of Nunavut.” It is notable to point out in recent years northern territories have experienced milder winters due to drastic climate changes.

As for Western Canada, there is no need to fear this upcoming winter completely. According to a forecast done by meteorologist Anthony Farnell, he states that, “snowfall will be heavy early in the season with a higher frequency of weak clippers later in the winter.”

Meaning the beginning of winter might seem brutal but it would most likely die out by the last month. In comparison to The Weather Networks’ Chris Scott, similar findings were confirmed as he claimed that it might seem like a “wild winter,” but by the last month the winter will go away.

 


Image 1 of Montreal after a snowstorm in December 2007. Image credits to Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press. 

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Written by Melissa Lopez-Martinez

Melissa Lopez-Martinez is a second year media student at the University of Guelph-Humber.

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