Eli Ridder | The Post

Board of Directors candidate Kendrick Tran told the Post on Friday that it is important to ensure that all students are heard and advocated for, touting his experience and transparency as reasons for the electorate to vote for him.


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“In this time, I feel it is important to be well [diverse] and hear all voices, no matter how small or how large,” Tran, a first year running to represent the University of Guelph-Humber, said in a written statement.

Tran, 18, is currently an Academic Program Representative, a role he says has allowed him to be familiar with IGNITE “behind the scenes” where he learned “how to communication with students effectively.”

The current APR listed platform points as “all inclusive, experienced [and] total transparency”, encouraging students to “vote for the person you trust, believe in, and can see yourself talking too.”

When asked about why students should vote for him, Tran said “my reason for running is one that I believe is unmatched.”

“My entire life, I wasn’t the most talkative, but that’s what made me a ‘good listener’,” the Media Studies Program student said.

Tran explained that being a director on the board is about a “a thrive for change, and being a good listener so you can make the most effective changes as possible.”

The candidate said that as a “little, gay Asian ‘boi'” he was part of the minority at Guelph-Humber.

Tran stressed he was not pulling the “race” or “minority card” but could stand by his minority status and express it at the Board of Directors should he be elected.

“I am going to be honest, I can’t guarantee that everything will change, but I will try my absolute hardest to make them heard,” he said.

Tran said that while one position isn’t necessarily harder than another, a board member “is actually higher than a president or [vice president].”

In short, the Board of Directors is in charge of making all the major decisions, and making sure that the voices and opinions of the students are included into any decisions made,” he said, in a statement echoing what previous candidates have pointed out.

IGNITE elections take place starting on Mar. 12, with winners announced on Mar. 16 for the Board of Directors and executive positions.


Full transparency

Kendrick Tran told the Post that he has nothing to hide and described himself as an “open book”, saying that he will be easy to contact if elected to the board.

“Full transparency is something that I completely believe in,” he said.

“People hide many aspects of themselves and what they do for the sheer fact of making themselves ‘look better’.”

Tran said he is open to “all input and conversation from whomever.”

“To ensure that student see the full transparency on my behalf, I will give access to any information that I am able to give, to whomever needs it.”

Although he is not an incumbent on the board, Tran referenced the “presence” of the Board of Directors as something that could be improved.

“To be honest, until I was APR, I had no idea we even had a Board of Directors.”

When asked about what type of student leader he would be, Tran said he would be the “kind representative” if elected.

“I will be a proactive activist representative,” he told the Post.

Citing slow walkers and people playing music out loud on public transit as annoyances, Tran said that his biggest “pet peeve” are with those “who do the very minimum.”

“I feel as, if you are going to do something, you should do it with 200 per cent or don’t do it at all.”


More elections coverage to follow. Image of the Atrium at the University of Guelph-Humber from the Post. 

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Written by Eli Ridder

Eli Ridder is a journalism student at the University of Guelph-Humber and a senior correspondent for multiple independent publications including, but not limited to, The Anon Journal, Berning Media Network and the Ribbon. Find out more at eliridder.ca

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