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Jane Philpott says PM Justin Trudeau ‘broke the law’

Former Liberal Party Caucus member and MP Jane Philpott has said that PM Justin Trudeau has broken the law with his recent dismissal of herself and Jody Wilson-Raybould. The decision is leftr to the Speaker of the House of Commons Geoff Regan.

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On Tuesday morning, former MP and Liberal Party caucus member Jane Philpott asked the Speaker of the House of Commons if Prime Minister Trudeau broke the law with his recent dismissal of both herself and Jody Wilson-Raybould.

This comes in light of the recent revelation that Wilson-Raybould had recorded a phone call between herself and Privy Council Clerk Michael Wernick.

This was what PM Trudeau used as grounds for dismissal and expulsion of both former ministers, calling Wilson-Raybould’s actions “unconscionable” and that they could no longer be trusted.

Philpott, now an independent MP, declared that within the Parliament of Canada Act, MPs are not able to be removed from caucus without a vote from the party itself, and although many ministers did publicly call for their dismissal, Philpott says there is no record of a caucus vote dedicated to the expulsion of herself and Wilson-Raybould.

Philpott is currently communicating with the Speaker of the House of Commons Geoff Regan on whether or not her argument could be sustained.


Featured Image: Jane Philpott and PM Justin Trudeau, Google Images ■

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Canada

Trudeau conciliatory after election, will not form coalition

The PM talks to the press.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who will keep the position after his Liberal Party won a strong minority, acknowledged on Wednesday his loss of support from the previous election with a conciliatory tone but ruled out a formal or informal coalition with another party.

It was during a half hour press conference at the National Press Theatre that Trudeau said his new cabinet will be sworn in on Nov. 20 and feature once again gender-equality as he aims to rebuild a broken image after a rocky year that saw Liberal polling drop.

Many analysts and political pundits have pointed out that a minority government — when a party receives less than 170 seats in the House of Commons — is not all bad.

Universal healthcare, the Canada Pension Plan, student loans, the official flag and more came about under Liberal minority governance, specifically Mike Pearson. Stephen Harper brought about tax reform, the Accountability Act and more with his first, minority term.

Trudeau confirmed during the early afternoon press conference that his government would charge ahead with the contentious Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project. The New Democrats, who are viewed as natural progressive allies to the Liberal minority, are opposed.

For his first moves, the prime minister said “our first priority will be to continue to lower taxes for the middle class”, legislation that could gain support from the Conservatives.

“We will also act on medically assisted dying as requested by the courts,” he added, a move that likely would be backed by the New Democrats. ■

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Campus

Election results show that Liberals stay in power

The Tories won the popular vote.

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The prime minister of Canada will remain Justin Trudeau, at least for the time being.

The intensity of the election results kept many individuals within Canada watching until the end of the campaign despite where they are from. 

The numbers of the seats were going up and down between the different parties that were involved in the Federal election. 

Within the first hour and a half, there were only five parties that filled the seats in the House of Commons, which were the Liberal Party, the Conservatives Party, the Bloc Québécois, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party. 

After the first hour and a half, there was a seat for a third-party organization, which managed to keep the vote until the end of the election campaign. 

The People’s Party did not manage to snag any seats in Ottawa.

The turnout in total came out to be 64.9 per cent and it was a loss of 3.3 per cent. 

The results came out with Liberals having 156 seats, Conservatives having 122 seats, 32 seats for Bloc Québécois, 24 seats for the New Democrats, three seats for Green party and one Independent, Judy Wilson-Raybould. 

The Conservative Party actually beat the Liberals in the popular vote because they had a total of 5,866,327 votes while the Liberals had a total of 5,609,477. 

After a four-hour election results period and the close amount of votes between the Conservatives and the Liberals, CBC declared a Liberal minority government at 2:09 a.m. ■

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Canada

What happens if there is a minority government?

If the Liberals or Tories win a minority.

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On Monday evening, Canada will make its choice for which party will form the next government, however, it may not be the party that receives the most seats that ends up running the country if they only win a minority.

If one party wins 170 ridings, which translate to seats in the House of Commons, than they win a majority and it’s game over: they form the next government and win have no issue passing legislation as long as their number remains 170 or above.

However, should one party win the most seats, but fall short of that magic 170, then they will hold a minority government and will need the support of at least other members of parliament or parties to pass laws.

A minority government is also vulnerable to losing power. If party A wins a minority but party B and C have 170 or more when combined, they could create a coalition and form a governing alliance.

This happened in British Columbia where a coalition of New Democrats and Greens overthrew the ruling Liberal Party which was reduced to a minority in the last provincial election there.

Growing talk in the media over the past week regarding a coalition between the Liberals and New Democrats has taken up a lot of air time, but Trudeau has dismissed the rumours, saying he is focused on electing a “progressive government”.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said on the weekend that he would “absolutely” be open to forming a coalition with other parties, such as the Liberals, to stop Andrew Scheer and his Conservative Party. He aimed to walk it back on Monday by stating his focus was on getting NDP votes.

The Liberals and Conservatives have been relatively tied in amalgamated polling as the New Democrats move up in polling. As of Wednesday morning, the Liberals and Tories are hovering around 32 per cent and the New Democrats have risen to 17.4 per cent.

At one point, it appeared that the Green Party would surpass the New Democrats when they were hovering around 11 per cent.

But percentages of the popular vote do not equal seats. Right now, the CBC Poll Tracker has the Liberals at 40 per cent and the Tories sit at 43 per cent for probability of winning the most seats but not a majority. The Liberals are at 11 per cent and Tories at 5 per cent for winning a majority.

This is what is most likely if there is a minority government, according to what the pundits and analysts are saying: if the Tories win a minority, the Liberals and NDP could team up in a coalition to form a “progressive” government.

However, if the Liberals form a minority, it is unlikely that there would be a coalition, but the New Democrats could be an ally to pass legislation. ■

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